Tropical Fruits in Panama

I love tropical fruits.  Some fruits as the Guanabana has a bitter-sweet flavor and other fruits are so sweet such as a good Mango or mangosteen.

tropical fruits

Some of my favorite fruits that you should try in Panama are:

  1.  Guanábana:  Is a large fruit whci can be up to 42cm long and weight up to 4kg.  Th shape is ovoid and curde at the lower end with thin, shiny, dark green skin that is covered with thorns.  The inside flesh is delicious, white, juice and bitter-sweet.  One of my favorite tropical juices is the Guanabana and you can eat if fresh fruit, juice or as a sorbet.
  2. Mango:  definitely one of my favoritefruites.  Is aromatic, sweet and tasty.  There are so many different varieties of mangos and in Panama you have many different options.   The most common way to eat it is as a whole fresh fruit.  The pulp however is used for chutney, jellies, and juices.
  3. Mangosteen:  this is also a delicious tropical fruit.  Is round, fleshy with a diameter between 6 and 7cm and smoth skin.  The flesh is white and sweet and very juicy.  It is a very delicate flavor and is eaten fresh.  This fruit has a lot of vitamin C, B1 and B2 and is exellent source of potassium and calcium.
  4. Tamarindo:  this small, round fruit mainly brown in color can be made into jellies, sauces and juices.  This fruietaids digestion and helps gastritis and gastroenterities.  My grandmother used to made tamarind balls with sugar as a candy when we were kids.  Amazingly delicious.

Discover this and more tropical fruits when travel with us.  Panama will surprise you for our diversity.  Contact us info@ecocircuitos.com

 

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Mango Mango

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By Jorge Ventocilla

Mango production is different every year; and every season is different for each and every mango tree. Some experts say that it all depends on the characteristics of each dry season. They also say that different branches produce different amount of mangoes and I see mangoes everywhere.

Coming back from the countryside a few weeks ago, I was looking at the landscape through the bus window, at least visible areas not hidden by advertisements, and found myself counting how many mango trees were along the road (per kilometer). I counted a minimum of fifteen trees per kilometer.

There are so many mango trees in Panama that it may lead us to think that they are native to this country.  Truth be told, Mangifera indica, scientific name of the tree, comes from India; Eastern India, Myanmar (Burma) and Andaman Islands, to be exact.

For complete article please click here.