A visit to the Volcano Crater in El Valle

By Raffaele Capomolla

Have you heard about El Valle de Anton? There you will find the crater of a dormant volcano that once used to be the largest of Central America, and it’s located just a 2 hours drive from Panama City. It is a great place for hikers and birders, but also if you just want to escape from the hot and humid weather in the city – this picturesque valley is 600 m above the sea level and offers a cool and pleasant climate. You will find a lot of attractions in El Valle, such as hot springs, canopy zip lines, butterfly gardens, waterfalls, rock climbing and hikes for all abilities!

Ecocircuitos offers exciting tours to visit The Crater of El Valle de Anton; just contact sales@ecocircuitos.com if we can help you with more information just let us know.  Our guides will made the difference and will take you to the secret spots in this natural jewel.

empanada

 

Secret Tip: Do you want to try the best Cheese-empanadas of Panama? Well, so you should absolutely go to Quesos Chela! It’s just in the middle of the way to El Valle, it’s a MUST-Stop, trust me!

 

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Gastronomy experience in Panama

By Juliette Darmon

There is no culture without gastronomy!

But too often and unfortunately, people tend to think that a gastronomy tour vulgarly means eating all day…

But here is the mistake! Gastronomy fully takes part of a cultural journey!
It’s a real rich and unmissable experience for a complete trip!

Of course the main goal of a gastronomic tour is making you tasting the best, traditional and local products and specialties of the country, but it also means showing you a cultural area of the city and the best places and locations to discover this culture, some typical and hidden sites you wouldn’t have thought about.

A gastronomic tour is also learning more about the culture, and your passionate guide will follow you throughout the itinerary. It’s a real adventure unlike a lot of people can think!

More than just tasting in our Panama Gastronomy experience, you will learn about how traditional dishes and local products as chocolate, coffee or honey are made and their whole process, and you will even have the possibility to visit some factories!

You could admire the view on the extensive skyline of Panama City while trying a ceviche at the Mercado de mariscos or the famous “raspado” on the Cinta Costera.

To end your culinary tour in the capital you may get on a guided tour through the microbrewery and taste some of their beer specialties. Also if time permits you could visit a Rum factory to try the artisanal Panamanian rum.

One day or one week, a culinary journey can be fascinating and so rewarding!

Out of the city, in the Azuero Peninsula you could so visit a local Rum factory, learning about the complete process of rum production – from harvesting the sugarcane until tasting the golden liquid. Then enjoy discovering the manufacturing processes of the traditional products of the Herrera Province: sugarcane, salt, clay and bread. In addition, you will have the chance to lodge in an eco coffee farm in the Boquete province.

The day after you will visit the coffee plantations and learn about the complete process of making coffee before tasting it at the end of the tour while enjoying an extensive view on the surrounding highlands.

Once the coffee tour ended, you will go on a local honey plant located on a small farm in the highlands of Boquete to end with a world-class honey tasting.

And what’s better than ending by a tour in the jungle to visit the Embera community and trying their fresh fish lunch?
In case you were skeptical, you are now aware of what does a gastronomic tour mean, and that is not just “stuffing” yourself with food…

So book a culinary tour now with EcoCircuitos to get into the Panamanian culture!

How long have Native American peoples lived on the Isthmus of Panama?

From STRI.org

All Native American peoples in Central and South America descend from Northeast Asians who travelled down the Pacific Coast 20,000-15,000 years ago, settling in Chile by 14,500 years ago.Image

If migrants travelled along the coast, their camps in Panama were submerged as sea levels rose when the last ice age was ending, leaving no trace.

Nor did humans make any impact on forests near La Yeguada (Veraguas) until 13,200 years ago when clearing and burning began. At this time Clovis hunters camped at the Vampiros rock shelter (Coclé) and made Clovis stone spear points and hide scrapers at nearby Sarigua (Herrera). They probably hunted mastodons and giant ground sloths.

By 6000 years ago maize, manioc and squash had arrived from their respective domestication centers in Mexico and South America. Farming expanded and settlements became larger and more permanent.

Panama’s seven Native American peoples descend from earlier populations living on or near the Isthmus for thousands of years. Eighty percent of modern Panamanians have a Native American woman as their original female ancestor.

For more information see the complete article by staff scientist Richard Cooke: How long have Native Americans lived in Panama?