More about Zika in Panama

Zika virus infection is an emerging infection now widespread through much of Latin America.  There is a strong potential that this infection will continue to spread.  A Zika infection spreads through mosquito bites and is typically manifested as a mild flu-like illness, fever, a rash, conjunctivitis, and joint pains but most cases are “silent”, meaning that the infected person feels no symptoms at all.  Health authorities such as the U.S. Center for Disease Control and World Health Organization harbor serious concerns that an infection during pregnancy can cause birth defects in new borns whose mothers may have been infected with the Zika virus.  The latest list of all the countries covered by the CDC Travel Alert Level 2 can be found here: CDC Travel Health Information. 

The Panamanian Ministry of Health (MINSA) has confirmed 50 Zika cases.  To date, the outbreak has been confined to the Guna Yala province.  MINSA Department of Epidemiology is working with the Gorgas Memorial Institute to control mosquitos in the affected areas.  Gorgas provides the testing facilities for Zika.  The latest notices from MINSA can be found here.

For the latest and more in-depth information, please also see the following: 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Zika Virus

Pan American Health Organization Zika Virus

Best Diving and Snorkeling Spots in Panama

From: Dive Advisor

Panama was named after an indigenous word meaning, “abundance of fish.” This beautiful Central America paradise is one of the few places in the world where you can dive two oceans in one day. With the warm, tropical waters of the Caribbean on its east and the cooler waters of the Pacific on the west, it’s just a two-hour car ride between them in some places. Panama boasts 1,207km of Caribbean coast and 1,700km of Pacific coast.

On the Caribbean side, divers come for the abundance of colorful reef fish and corals. When rating the best diving in Central American, Bocas del Toro always comes up with its white sand beaches and many calm and the Bastimentos Marine National park. It’s a great place to learn how to dive and the marine life make it a great place to keep diving. Another popular spot on the Caribbean coast is Colon, only two hours from Panama City. Just offshore, the Portobelo National Marine Park has beautiful corals and the area is filled with a history of pirate battles and sunken ships.  Sir Francis Drake died at sea in 1596 and his body, clad in a full suit of armour and in a lead coffin, is thought to be off the coast of Portobello.

On the Pacific side, cooler waters and currents make encounters with pelagic common. Lucky divers can see several species of shark, whale sharks, humpback whales, dolphins, and more. Coiba National Marine Park is often referred to as the Galapagos of Central America and has the second largest coral reef in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the Pearl Archipelago also offers great options close to Panama City.

Just nine degrees north of the equator, Panama is hot and humid year round. The rainy season is May- November and the dry season is December-April (with less humidity and almost no rain.) Panama is not in the hurricane belt, but it can get strong winds from nearby storms. Air temperatures throughout the year range form 20-32C, being a bit cooler in the winter/dry season. Water temperatures vary between coasts. The Caribbean side the water can be as cool as 25C in the winter and as warm as 28C in the summer. Coiba can get as cold as 20C during winter and reaches a high of around 24C in the summer.

Best Spots to Dive in Panama

Coiba National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that includes 38 islands. Lonely Planet says it’s “The best diving to be found along the Pacific Coast from Columbia to Mexico.” Coiba gets the big stuff. Sharks can be seen on almost every dive including white-tip reef sharks, black-tip reef sharks, and occasional hammerheads, bull, and tiger sharks. Whale sharks are common visitors from December to April. Humpback whales are seen July through October and orcas and pilot whales frequent the area. Large schools of mantas and mobula rays sometimes swim by, and most dives have turtles, schools of large fish, angelfish, butterflyfish, and dolphins.

On the Caribbean side of Panama, close to the Costa Rica boarder, is Bocas del Toro. This archipelago of nine large islands includes the protected area of Isla Bastimentos National Marine. Bocas is known for its well-preserved hard and soft corals. Being outside of the official hurricane zone, away from large cities and river mouths, the coral is very healthy. It is estimated that 95% of the coral species found in the Caribbean Sea can be found within the archipelago.

Tiger Rock is rated one of the best dive sites around Bocas del Toro, and is three rock pinnacles that rise up from the sea floor at 40m. It’s an advanced dive and can have strong currents, but is a good place to see sharks, rays, large fish schools, whale sharks and dolphins. Its location requires perfect sea conditions for boats to be able to get there. Dolphin Rock is another offshore rock formation where sharks can be seen and has lots of colorful fish life. The diving is also very good around Zapatillas Cays, another more distant boat ride.

Closer to town, Bouy Line is a poplar shallow site (near a deep water channel buoy) that has sea horses, lionfish, crabs, and lots of morays. Hospital Point is near the north end of Isla Solarte and has healthy cauliflower and brain corals on a sloping wall. The dive usually has a slow current and is 15m deep max. Sashek is another drift dive between Bastimentos and Carenero that has rare long lure frogfish. Airport is a protected site good for training dives, and has lots of coral.

Also on the Caribbean side, but further southeast is Portobelo National Park. This is also a popular diving area with great marine life. Being closer to Panama City, people come directly from the city to dive this area that has great reef dives and several wrecks.

Water temperatures on the Caribbean side are warm year round (23-27C) and a 3mm is usually plenty. On the Pacific side, colder currents bring waters (15-23C), so a 5mm will be comfortable. For those doing deep dives in the winter, thermoclines can be present, so a 7mm might be useful.

If you are looking for good snorkelling one of the best spots is the San Blas Archipelago.  In this Guna land is forbidden to dive with a tank but here you will find one of the most untouched coral reefs by mankind. The reef holds its beauty for decades now since people do not pollute the waters around it.  The Kuna Indians or Guna indians live from the sea and hunt on it. They hunt the reefs and sandbanks by using simple snorkeling gear and do not over fish their own waters because they only take what is needed to stay alive. They are scared that scuba dives will kill the great schools of fish and leave the Kuna without food to survive. They will preserve the coral reef for future generations this way.

The rich sea life and the crystal clear water will give you plenty enough time to drift away from the world above water. One of the easy places to get in touch with this sea life is the shipwreck near Isla Perro. This place is perfect for people not used to snorkeling or scuba diving but also gives people that have done it before a nice challenge to spot all the sea life around the ship. Don’t forget to bring your underwater camera because spotting a wild turtle, shark or octopus isn’t a rare sight in the waters around the San Blas Islands.   The best way to snorkel in San Blas is charter a sailing boat.  EcoCircuitos Panama organize this adventure for you.

12 Buddhist Eco-Guidelines – Inspiration

Buddha by EternalTraveler
Buddha by EternalTraveler

As we strive to cultivate a positive relationship with the environment, we need to first realize there are two facets to the journey – preserving inner happiness and maintaining outer ecological balance.

We encourage everyone to start with beautifying one’s mind and spirit and then extend outward to beautifying their environment.

Below are twelve guidelines when travel to a new destination:

 * Speak quietly – do not disturb others.

* Keep the ground clean – do not litter.

* Keep the air clean – do not smoke or pollute.

* Respect oneself and others – do not commit violent acts.

* Be polite – do not intrude upon others.

* Smile – do not face others with an angry expression.

* Speak kindly – do not utter abusive words.

* Follow the rules – do not seek exemptions or privileges.

* Be mindful of your actions – do not act unethically.

* Consume consciously – do not waste.

* Be grounded – do not live aimlessly.

* Practice kindness – do not create malice

Adapted from Living Affinity, by Hsing Yun (Lantern Books, 2004).

Celebrate Green Friday with EcoCircuitos Panama

This November 28th when everyone will be rushing to the malls to shop, EcoCircuitos Panama will be supporting a local school by promoting environmental education.  We want to encourage the Panamanian youth on the importance of taking care of our environment.  By simple tasks as recycling, garbage disposal and other responsible practices that everyone can benefit from. Instead of being caught in traffic and the hustle and bustle in the city, join your community to turn Black Friday into Green Friday and plant a tree.  For those interested in a different adventure on the weekend, ask our office for the green tours including kayaking, biking, hiking and birding day tours.

Panama’s Geisha conquers Japan

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From The Visitor

During the last “Specialty Coffee of Japan” fair that took place last week in Tokyo, Panamanian producers of the coffee varietal known as “Geisha” secured over $400,000 worth of orders.

The Panamanian producers arrived as part of a delegation sponsored by the Ministry of Commerce and Industries, a government agency intent on promoting the country’s agricultural exports through participation in these types of events.

Panama’s Geisha coffee is condierede one of the world’s most expensive and sought after coffees.  Its price is adjusted yearly according to how is offered at auctions.  Geisha coffee has won multiple first place awards in Specialty Coffee of American Roaster’s Guild competitions, and the Best of Panama auctions.

To read the complete note click here: