Panama Reading List

You are planning your trip to Panama and it is exciting!  Below you will find some reading material that could help you plan your trip and do some research.  Some of our reading recommendations include books about birds, wildlife, history, culture and more.   Also if you would like to share some other books and articles with us, please feel free to send us an email at info@ecocircuitos.com

Moon Panama (Moon Handbooks)

William Friar

Moon Travel

Frommer’s Panama (Complete Guide)

Nicholas Gill

Frommer’s 

Panama: Puente Biologico

Stanely Heckadon

Instituto Smithsonian de Investigaciones Tropicales

Naturalists on the Isthmus of Panama (A hundred years of Natural History on the biological bridge of the Americas)

Stanley Heckadon-Moreno

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

A Bird-Finding Guide to Panama

George R. Angehr

Cornell University Press

The Birds of Panama

George R. Angehr & Robert Dean

Cornell University Press

A Guide to the Birds of Panama

Robert Ridgely

Princeton University Press

The Path Between the Seas

David McCullough

Simon and Schuster

A Day on Barro Colorado Island

Marina Wong / Jorge Ventocilla

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Reef Fish Identification – Baja to Panama

Paul Humann / Ned DeLoach

New World Publications

Central America: A Natural and Cultural History

Anthony G. Coates

Yale University Press

A Field Guide to the Mammals of Central America and Southeast Mexico

Fiona A. Reid

Oxford University Press

A Neotropical Companion (An introduction to the animals, plants, & ecosystems of the New World tropics)

John Kricher

Princeton University Press

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tourism and Conservation in Panama

Panama’s wildlife is just stunning – 10’444 different types of plant species, 678 fern species, 1’500 varieties of trees, as well as 255 species of mammals and 972 indigenous bird species. There is a history behind this rich biodiversity, let’s start from the very beginning: Everything started 65 million years ago; the two continents, North and South America were joined by a land bridge, as we know it from today. Then, around 50 million years ago, the continents split apart, and for millions of years they kept separate from one another. This allowed mother nature to create unique and fascinating landscapes in both continents. The land of South America soon gave rise to a numerous species, such as bird families, neo-tropical rodents, iguanas, frogs and more. In North America, animals such as horses, deer, raccoons, squirrels and mice flourished, as the continent repeatedly collided with Eurasia.

Three million years ago happened the world change!   The natural history for both continents: The land bridge of Panama arose. Migration started and species from North America went south and from South America north, where they found their homes in the lush forest and wetlands along the isthmus. The great variety of plant species created the perfect conditions for nourishing wildlife including the Jaguar.

‘Yaguará’ is a Panamanian Foundation that works towards the conservation of  wild cats. They are studying the Jaguar’s behavior through placing cameras and GPS Collars, in order to develop conservation in the jaguar habitats. They also directly work with the local communities, which has proved to be very important and successful to immediately apply conservation of this beautiful mammals.

Ricardo Moreno who has been nominated by National Geographic as an emergent explorer, is a Panamanian biologist and one of the the leader of  Fundación Yaguara. He fights for the conservation of the Jaguar and the Puma in Panama, and says that “the situation is critical, and there is no time to wait. It is important to create a pacific cohabitation between mankind and the felines.”

The conflicts between Felines and humans arose because their natural prey was scarce, due to human activities such as hunting and habitat occupation, threrefore the cats attacked livestock’s. Unfortunately, people used to “solve” the situation by just sacrificing the felines, and this caused a serious fall in jaguar’s populations in the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor and Panama. Several studies showed that if the cats had enough natural prey, they wouldn’t attack livestock.

“Yaguará” started a program which gives a monetary compensation to the owners of domestic animals, if their animals were preyed.  They also support the local communities by educating in learning to live with the jaguars and avoid killing them.   The communities could take benefit from conserving the natural habitats and supporting the trend in the tourism industry:  Adventure and Conservation.

Academic and Educational adventures are a way to discover Panama and learn about the efforts of several scientists, guides and tour companies that promote the restoration of our natural habitats.   In conjunction with different organizations such as STRI, Fundacion Avifauna, APTSO, YAGUARA among others EcoCircuitos is promoting Tourism, Conservation and Education.

Explore with the experts in the field and discover a country full of contrasts.  You can contribute to the conservation and efforts of this organization and others by traveling responsable.

For more information contact us info@ecocircuitos.com

Inauguration of the amplification of Causeway

By Raffaele Capomolla

Last Saturday the President of the Republic of Panama Juan Carlos Varela inaugurated the amplification of the “Calzada de Amador” or also called “Causeway”, which has been constructed to increase the touristic potential in this iconic area. The Causeway counts with playgrounds, sports fields, resting places, hotels and restaurants. Walking through Causeway also allows you to enjoy a beautiful view of the Pacific Ocean, Bridge of Americas, Panama City’s skyline and also the breathtaking giant boats entering the canal.

The Causeway has been constructed in 1903 using the Rocks which were excavated from the construction of the Panama Canal and is today the second longest boardwalk in the City. Historically the Causeway has a great importance, as it dates back to the colonial time of the Spanish; the treasures that were brought from Peru by the Conquistadores were landed using the four islands. Then, from 1915 until World War II, the Causeway was used by the United States as a military base and powerful defense system. It was only in 1996 when the Country of Panama became the proprietary of the Causeway and all the Panamanians finally had complete access to the area.

Come and discover this and much more beautiful sights in Panama!

 

Tourism, Education and Conservation in Panama: STRI

Panama has to be considered as one of the leading destinations for students interested in tropical biology and rainforest preservation. As a land bridge between the two continents, Panama is a meeting place of over 970 species of birds from North and South America. Its tremendous biodiversity and the accessibility of its tropical forests make Panama a paradise for nature and ecological studies. Panama itself is a flower garden with more than 1500 species of trees and more than 10,000 species of plants. With two oceans washing its shores, Panama is rich in marine life.

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institution (STRI) in Panama, is a bureau of the Smithsonian Institution based outside of the United States, is dedicated to understanding biological diversity.

What began in 1923 as small field station on Barro Colorado Island, in the Panama Canal Zone, has developed into one of the leading research institutions of the world. STRI’s facilities provide a unique opportunity for long-term ecological studies in the tropics, and are used extensively by some 900 visiting scientists from academic and research institutions in the United States and around the world every year. The work of our resident scientists has allowed us to better understand tropical habitats and has trained hundreds of tropical biologists.

STRI is the perfect partner for Academic and Educational Tours in the Tropics:

Panama’s remarkable biodiversity and the accessibility of its tropical forests make it a paradise for nature and ecological studies. Our trip will expose participants to the natural wonders of lowland tropical forest, cloud forest and coral reef ecosystems. Culturally, students will have the opportunity to interact with and learn about our local communities and to experience city life in the developing world.

Menú Panamá en el Biomuseo

114Este sábado 20 de Marzo, 2015-  el Biomuseo presenta “Menú Panamá” un encuentro gastronómico para los amantes del buen comer.  Con la comida de fonda como tema, reconocidos chefs locales como Chombolín (Íntimo, que se estará inaugurando próximamente), María de los Ángeles (Humo BBQ), Alberto Perrino (Azafrán), Enrique Hendricks (Oink House) y José Olmedo (Donde José) estarán versionando platos tradicionales de fonda.

Además participarán chefs internacionales que forman parte de la conocida lista de la versión Latino América de “The World’s 50 Best” :   la chef Kamila Seidler, del restaurante Gustu (Bolivia), Gonzalo Aramburu, del restaurante Aramburu (Argentina) y José Antonio González, de Al Mercat (Costa Rica).

El evento tendrá lugar en el Museo de la Biodiversidad – BIOMUSEO, ubicado en el Causeway a partir de las 5:00 pm y los participantes podrán degustar 5 platos, además de open bar, y actuaciones musicales. Un espacio en el que podrá compartir con los chefs y artista.  No se lo pierda!!

Slow-moving shallows put the heat on Bocas Coral

From STRI.org

Snorkel-perfect coral reefs in the calm, mangrove-fringed waters of the Bocas Del Toro Archipelago are expected to be among the hardest hit by warmer temperatures that lead to coral bleaching and mortality, a new study finds. These shallows in Panama’s Caribbean are characterized by low water flow, allowing water to reach precariously high sea surface temperature (SST) when compared to areas with greater water movement.

Angang Li and Matthew Reidenbach of the University of Virginia tapped into a wealth of long-term monitoring data collected by STRI scientists around the Bocas Del Toro Research Station, including coral bleaching records. Their models were published this May in the journal Coral Reefs.

“By 2084, almost all coral reefs are susceptible to bleaching-induced mortality, except for a region of relatively lower thermal stress along the outer boundary of the archipelago,” they write. “By 2084, only corals exposed to open ocean currents are predicted to survive.”

corals

 

There are some caveats. The key to heat-induced coral bleaching is not a single blast of hot water, rather long-term exposure to above-threshold temperatures. This is measured in degree heating weeks (DHW). By the end of the study period DHW >8 °C-weeks were modeled for the bay. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicts widespread bleaching and significant mortality under these conditions. By comparison, DHW values during a 2010 Bocas bleaching event ranged between 2.3 °C-weeks and 9.5 °C-weeks.

Some coral species may adapt to higher temperatures. The study’s models predict that areas flushed by cooler water will have a higher chance at surviving well into the future.

Li and Reidenbach studied modern water-flow patterns, simulated heating scenarios for the 2020s, 2050s and 2080s, and quantified local thermal stress on coral reefs. While previous studies have looked at SST impact on corals at a large scale, the researchers focused on a much smaller spatial scale, which is less common. The fine scale of their work better lends itself to the creation of mitigation strategies for marine protected areas in Bocas.

“Our findings are also likely applicable to many coral reef regions worldwide, and in particular reefs that are found in shallow and partially enclosed coastal regions with long water retention times,” they conclude.

ExpoTurismo Panama 2014

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The Panama Chamber of Commerce, Industries, and Agriculture (CCIAP) and the Panama Chamber of Tourism (CAMTUR), with the support of the Panama Tourism Authority (ATP) are organizing the fifth (V) edition of the International Tourism Expo, to be held on September 26 and 27, 2014 in the ATLAPA Convention Center in Panama City.

The International Tourism Expo has become the annual meeting place for tourist service providers and wholesalers from more than 20 countries who attend this event seeking new destinations, suppliers, and a variety of products and services to offer.

We invite you to be a part of this very important project that benefits all companies in the tourist industry, since the fair serves as a business replication tool through the high-quality attendees it attracts. By pulling together such a range of different tourism service providers in the fair, we have consolidated numerous benefits that will attract over 130 big-name wholesale companies from abroad who come in search of new products and services from the participating exhibitors at the International Tourism Expo.

Our goal this year is to have the largest number of exhibiting countries so as to offer a wider variety to the wholesale buyers attending the event. The idea is to create a networking dynamic that will benefit as many countries as possible. Since these wholesalers are coming from more than 20 countries in Europe, North America, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America, companies such as airlines, tourism ministries, hotels and other lodging establishments would find it beneficial to participate and make contacts with all these people from different source markets gathered in one place whom are potential consumers of the products and services on exhibit.

One of the main benefits of this fair is that we have made a website ​​available to all participants for them to view the profiles of registered purchasers. An application will also allow them to request appointments in advance with those they are interested in meeting during the expo, thus compiling a virtual business agenda. In this way we can ensure that all exhibitors will have guaranteed business meetings. The event will be closed to general public on the first day and open exclusively for wholesalers and exhibitors, in order for them to conduct the scheduled meetings without any interruptions or distractions.